Don Quixote de La Mancha, Vol 1

Don Quixote de La Mancha, Vol 1❮Reading❯ ➻ Don Quixote de La Mancha, Vol 1 Author Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra – Bluevapours.co.uk Don Quixote, errant knight and sane madman, with the company of his faithful squire and wise fool, Sancho Panza, together roam the world and haunt readers imaginations as they have for nearly four hun Don Quixote, errant knight de La PDF ↠ and sane madman, with the company of his faithful squire and wise fool, Sancho Panza, together roam the world and haunt readers imaginations as they have for nearly four hundred years.

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra de La PDF ↠ was a Spanish novelist, poet, and playwright His novel Don Quixote is often considered his magnum opus, as well as the first modern novelIt is assumed that Miguel de Cervantes was born in Alcal de Henares His father was Rodrigo de Cervantes, a surgeon of cordoban descent Little is known of his mother Leonor de Cortinas, except that she was a native of Arganda del ReyIn , Cervantes moved Don Quixote Epub / to Italy, where he served as a valet to Giulio Acquaviva, a wealthy priest who was elevated to cardinal the next year By then, Cervantes had enlisted as a soldier in a Spanish Navy infantry regiment and continued his military life until , when he was captured by Algerian corsairs He was then released on ransom from his captors by his parents and the Trinitarians, a Catholic religious order He subsequently returned to his Quixote de La Epub µ family in MadridIn Esquivias Province of Toledo , on December , he married the much younger Catalina de Salazar y Palacios Toledo, Esquivias , October , daughter of Fernando de Salazar y Vozmediano and Catalina de Palacios Her uncle Alonso de Quesada y Salazar is said to have inspired the character of Don Quixote During the next years Cervantes led a nomadic existence, working as a purchasing agent for the Spanish Armada and as a tax collector He suffered a bankruptcy and was imprisoned at least twice and for irregularities in his accounts Between and , he lived primarily in Seville In , Cervantes settled in Madrid, where he remained for the rest of his lifeCervantes died in Madrid on April , Copied from Wikipedia.

Don Quixote de La Mancha, Vol 1 PDF/EPUB Ú Quixote de
  • Paperback
  • 452 pages
  • Don Quixote de La Mancha, Vol 1
  • Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
  • English
  • 14 May 2019
  • 1406791725

10 thoughts on “Don Quixote de La Mancha, Vol 1

  1. Kalliope says:

    You, my GR Friends and Readers must be wondering what is this cheese doing at the head of the review And I, the fictitious Kalliope, invite you to cut a slice and help yourself and savour the flavours of Manchego cheese Buts since you can t grab and eat the one displayed on your screen, then I suggest you take a substitute, some Edam, or Cheddar, or any other you have in your fridge, and then think and imagine that you are taking cheese from La Mancha, from the land of Don Quijote DQ For ac You, my GR Friends and Readers must be wondering what is this cheese doing at the head of the review And I, the fictitious Kalliope, invite you to cut a slice and help yourself and savour the flavours of Manchego cheese Buts since you can t grab and eat the one displayed on your screen, then I suggest you take a substitute, some Edam, or Cheddar, or any other you have in your fridge, and then think and imagine that you are taking cheese from La Mancha, from the land of Don Quijote DQ For according to him what you imagine is what exists I imagine that everything I say is true, noand no less, and I depict her Dulcinea in my imagination as I wish her to be in beauty and distinction view spoiler Yo imagino que todo lo que digo es as , sin que sobre ni falte nada, y p ntola en mi imaginaci n como la deseo spoiler hide spoiler This would work with the cheeses also.My father and this is for real , who had read DQ four times by the time he was eleven , would tell me that when reading Cervantes masterwork one had to keep on the side a platter of Manchego cheese and a carafe of red wine Tinto, and nibble and sip whenever the characters ate cheese and drank wine I used to think this was a joke but in this last,careful and pondering, read of DQ s First part 1605 view spoiler I am reviewing here only the First Part often published together, the second was written much later and published in 1616 hide spoiler , I realized that what seemed jest on his part was a literary comment with fundamental implications For as this novel is about the complex and fluid relationship between reality and fiction, and the dangers of fiction if you let it dominate your imagination, the best antidote is cheese Unless you engage your body and attend to its physiological needs regularly while you read, you run the danger of dissociating from your body and of losing your wits.So, please, help yourself now to a slice and take a sip I keep on my side a dish because behind that spirally kalliope there is a person who feels hungry and thirsty some times And better stick to the wine and do not dream of trying the Fierrabr s Balm, or you will regret it As did poor Sancho.Food has a literary role and helps in distinguishing the various literary genres from which this novel is made For example, Pedro, the common shepherd, eats, while Gris stomo, the literary student who placidly and harmoniously takes care of sheep, does not And had Quijote been called Don Gigote meaning meat stew , as Dorotea once thought, maybe things would have gone easier for him Cheese can be a good substitute for jewellery as Sancho reports when he tells DQ of his phony meeting with Dulcinea The practice of chivalric novels was to offer a precious stone to the messenger as a token of appreciation, but Sancho is proud that instead he got a better deal cheese of pure sheep milk queso ovejuno.DQ as a model knight errant, does not need to feed When Sancho offers him to share his victuals, DQ elegantly refuses he has never read in any of his chivalric novels that the knights, with the exception of attending enrapturing banquets, do bother with eating They just are in communion with nature and the wild weeds and herbs are sufficient to nourish their souls and courage Sancho then offers him some nuts nuts for the nut , but DQ, meekly insinuates that bread and sardines would be as good as the chivalric food and finally accepts Sancho s offer without further ado And at another point DQ acknowledges, after having lost some teeth in a fight that will make his eating muchdifficult, that teeth are better than diamonds Life in an imagined world is not always easy.For DQ s goals require demanding dedication When he sees the flock of sheep that make his fantasy fly and recites one of the most memorable passages in the novel, evoking all the grand deeds of his army of heroes, there comes a point when his grandiose personalities seem to dissolve and take the shape of sheep He needs reinforcement against the enchantments brought by the conjurers and wizards and drinks some of the Fierrabr s Balm The reader wishes that Sancho had given him, instead, some Tinto to drink.And it is food, and a bit of rest, what seems to calm down DQ when he enters in adangerous kind of madness a sort of dissociative disorder that only happens at the beginning of the book when DQ imagines himself to be someone else Once he thinks he is Reinaldos de Montalb n, from Boiardo s Orlando Innamorato, and another time he thinks he is Valdovinos from the Carolingian Romancier of the Marchess of Mantua and yet another time, he is convinced he is Abindarr ez That he could not be Abindarr ez I knew well, because a few months ago I attended the performance of the Historia del Abencerraje y la hermosa Jarifa, and I had gone for tapas beforehand and eaten some cheese, so I was immune to the fantasies to which DQ fell As for Valdovinos, again, had Sancho been able to show him the Valdovinos wine But maybe he did, for those dissociative fits do not repeat themselves.At stake then, is DQ s puzzle created by his broad reading view spoiler Martin de Riquer, the editor of my wonderful edition, expands on this hide spoiler He could not distinguish between three kinds of writing histories or chronicles that recorded facts historical fiction of various forms but still based on real people and the then pervasive chivalric novel made out of extravagant fantasies The origins of this confusion are partly semantic The Spanish word Novela novel originating in the Italian novella was relatively modern For prose works longer than a novella, Spanish could not use the French Roman or Italian Romanzo because Romance was a particular kind of poem Chronicles, fictional stories and the chivalric works all used the word Historia both history and novel DQ, as well as the Innkeeper towards the end of the novel, have been all confused with the various heroes, whether these were the Emperor Charles V, or Rodrigo D az de Vivar, or the real Rolando defeated in Roncesvalles, or the transformed and fantastical Orlando from both Boiardo s and Ariosto s works DQ isimpressed by the Knight of the Ardent Sword chivalry work by Feliciano de Silva than by Rodrigo D az de Vivar, El Cid apart from the Epic poem there were several chronicles Similarly, the Innkeeper also thinks that Felixmarte de Hircania, who with one stroke could cut in half five giants, is muchimpressive than El Gran Capit n Gonzalo Fern ndez de C rdoba the Great Captain who defeated the French in the last Italian wars.May be it would have helped, at least with El Gran Capit n, if Sancho had been able to show both the Innkeeper and DQ who had also expressed not to be too impressed by him that this heroic captain was so real that he has his own cheese.If we can conceive of this novel as a game on the borderlines between fiction and reality, representation and truth, game that Cervantes would explore even further when he took up the second part of his work, it comes as a tease to the reader how he warns the author of the book, the fictional Cide Hamete Berengeli, not to stray from what should be his goal, and not hold back parts of the truth The constant and deliberate presence of food in the novel, and the care to feed his characters regularly in spite of DQ occasional refusals , is part of Cervantes aim not to stray away from reality and make his fiction and his characters credible.The best for pursuing this aim, then, is just to cut another piece of Manchego and finish the glass of Tinto

  2. David says:

    First, an organizational note I actually read this in parallel, in the original Spanish, and in the Penguin Classics English translation by J.M Cohen Anyone who is interested can follow my tortured progress through Book I at the link below this review, I will attempt a coherent summary of my reaction to Book I, and in the process try to justify my two star rating.Let me start by saying that I really gave it my best shot I can t think of another book First, an organizational note I actually read this in parallel, in the original Spanish, and in the Penguin Classics English translation by J.M Cohen Anyone who is interested can follow my tortured progress through Book I at the link below this review, I will attempt a coherent summary of my reaction to Book I, and in the process try to justify my two star rating.Let me start by saying that I really gave it my best shot I can t think of another book that I ve read as closely Read it in Spanish AND in English Even to keep myself honest tried summarizing as I went, in deathless doggerel QUIK QUIXOTE I ve spent a month of my life with this book it s been a mild obsession Why Oh, I don t know Can we ever satisfactorily explain why we choose to give ourselves over to any specific whim I m here, in Madrid I m studying Spanish at a school that s called Don Quijote The time just seemed right And I had a strong feeling that it was going to be now or never But a coherent summary of my reaction eludes me, frankly This book alternately amused me and bored me to tears There are a couple of places where I laughed out loud But mostly I just wanted it to be over I wasn t about to quit But it felt awfully like a penance, much of the time Some random observations, for which I am forced to resort to the dreaded list of bullet items 1 The Spanish was oftenfun to read than the English Cervantes and Shakespeare were contemporaries down to the urban legend of having died on the same day But Spanish has changed considerably less in the intervening 400 years than English There were enough archaic words that I did feel reading the translation was a necessary check, but it was surprisingly straightforward in Spanish, and traduttori, tradittori one felt closer to the original story So I definitely enjoyed that aspect of reading the book it felt like a real confirmation that all the Spanish classes have paid off.2 I have a good general understanding of the book s place in literary history, and so was willing to cut it some slack that is to say, not to judge it as one would a modern novel That said, I still can t avoid saying that I found it enormously clunky The first couple of hundred pages were annoyingly episodic and formulaic addled Don meets a windmills b yokels c sheep d funeral mourners take your pick is confused, through ahilarious misunderstandingbut see point 5 below attacks them, gets the worst of the dustup, and ends in the ditch 3 Things improved a little in the second half of Book I , when some of the protagonists other than Don and Sancho start to appear on a recurring basis But don t look for in depth characterization, or much character development to speak of Cervantes is no Shakespeare OK Let me repeat that for the benefit of each and every one of my Spanish teachers, though I love them dearly People you are completely fucking delusional CERVANTES IS NO SHAKESPEARE When you make this comparison, you just make me want to resort to actual physical violence I ve read Shakespeare and, dudes, CERVANTES IS NO FUCKING SHAKESPEARE There ssubtlety, insight, and depth of understanding of human nature in almost any single Shakespeare play OK, Titus Andronicus is a little weird, but there are still over thirty to choose from than in this entire first volume Not to mention a superabundance of the most gorgeous language, though to be fair I can t quite fairly judge Cervantes on this score.4 When the plot isn t being all episodic, it s not really any great shakes either Mick is altogether too heavy handed with the AMAZING COINCIDENCE method of plot resolution Man, you wouldn t believe who all happens to mosey on by the same remote Manchegan inn, just in time to tie up a dangling plot thread I dunno It all seemsthan a little lazy Though I guess and I feel like I m really bending over backwards to give Mick the benefit of the doubt here why is that in retroactive justification of the time I invested reading this damned book maybe I m applying modern criteria and expectations here It s not as if all of Shakespeare s plots were entirely plausible either.5 Humor Ah, yes One of literature s great comic masterpieces Well, excuse me, if I fail to climb on this particular bandwagon I m sorry, but I just don t get it Let s be quite clear the humor, such as it is, is almost exclusively slapstick of the broadest kind If you like watching circus clowns do pratfalls, or if your dream television weekend is a Three Stooges marathon, then maybe you ll laugh like a drain But if you don t really find slapstick all that hilarious, or take vicarious pleasure in taunting and jeering at a deranged person, you will, as I was, wonder what all the fuss is about Yes I acknowledge that there is some wit in the book s initial premise a person addled by too much book reading But lemme tellya, it gets old awful quick It really does.One goodreads reviewer tells us, with no apparent irony, that this is the funniest book he has ever read in his life A statement that can only be literally true if he is a shut in with no access to a library.6 And on the subject of those ratings by other goodreads reviewers De gustibus non disputandum est i.e diff rent strokes. etc But really, folks, I m having a hard time swallowing it An average rating of 4.69 102 5 star ratings Might it not be possible, just faintly possible, that we have a slight case of what one might call classic intimidation going on The perhaps unconscious fear that people may think less of one for not appreciating one of the world s designated literary classics Did all these apparently rabid Quixote enthusiasts and how can I put this delicately ACTUALLY READ THE WHOLE BOOK All of it, without cheating All those pastoral poems by the love besotted shepherds The entire soporific Tale of Foolish Curiosity The limited empirical data available suggests that maybe close attention was not paid a mere 9.9% of respondents chose the correct answer to the goodreads quiz question about the fulling hammers.Just sayin I has my doubts.7 Because, here s the thing Large swaths of this book are intrinsically unreadable No, I mean it You read a page Your eyes glaze over You try it again Same phenomenon Cycle and repeat I humbly submit that the stuff in which Cervantes is engaged in direct spoofing of the knight errant genre all the stuff about Amadis of Gaul, the Don s argument with the Canon, the priest s adjudication of the various volumes in the Don s library, not to mention the interminable pastoral interludes with lovelorn shepherds and damsels dressed as shepherdesses could be considered interesting only by the most desperate of graduate students in need of a dissertation topic For anyone not engaged in abstruse academic investigation it s a freaking snoozefest Did I enjoy Don Quixote, Book I Only very sporadically Do I consider it one of the world s great books Absolutely not Will I read Book II Oddly enough, probably yes But not this trip And probably not this year Let the Don lie slumbering back home in La Mancha Myself, I hope to travel to Chile in July, and Argentina in August I think that other,appealing, opportunities will arise to extend my knowledge of literature in Spanish.So there you have it Sorry I told you that I probably wouldn t manage an entirely coherent review

  3. Stephen P says:

    The stars move toward an infinity not to be counted Yet so accessible They shift over making a space for me around the campfire as we listen to Cervantes narrator tell us tales nested within tales The emergence of modern tropes I follow the Don who will not cease to follow his life source his imagination his seeing the actual reality agreed upon lacking Robed in humor there is a biting edge of honing books as the source of life The inner life over the outer life Breeding laughter while The stars move toward an infinity not to be counted Yet so accessible They shift over making a space for me around the campfire as we listen to Cervantes narrator tell us tales nested within tales The emergence of modern tropes I follow the Don who will not cease to follow his life source his imagination his seeing the actual reality agreed upon lacking Robed in humor there is a biting edge of honing books as the source of life The inner life over the outer life Breeding laughter while breeding thought.What a reading experience I am so glad that I now have this volume as a part of me What I am perplexed about is that Volume 2 was written without permission by someone else and therefore a decade later Cervantes writes his a reaction or a creative urge Does anyone know the answer It would help me greatly in deciding whether to go onto Volume 2

  4. Chris M.H says:

    Such a beautiful and hilarious novel.It has heap loads of danger, insults, foolishness, comedy love It s all stories interwoven within stories and it s just brilliant I think the part I love most about this book is the affection each character has to someone else No one person seems without direction to send their passion and receive in turn The long scene in the Inn on the way back from Don Quixote s isolation in the wilderness and following deception in returning home by Dorothea and comp Such a beautiful and hilarious novel.It has heap loads of danger, insults, foolishness, comedy love It s all stories interwoven within stories and it s just brilliant I think the part I love most about this book is the affection each character has to someone else No one person seems without direction to send their passion and receive in turn The long scene in the Inn on the way back from Don Quixote s isolation in the wilderness and following deception in returning home by Dorothea and company is a wonderful example of this I found the episode in its entirety so engaging and exciting as you get to hear of masked arrivals, Don s imaginations of giant slaying, brothers being sent out by a prodigal but loving father only for one of them to be caught and used as a slave who then gets aided in escape by a beautiful Moor who eventually ends up at the Inn with the rest All of this passage is so beautifully interwoven and expressed, with the odd intermittent humour of Quixote that it probably surpasses anything I ve ever read.I ve seen somewhere that some readers of this book have found it lacking in vivid power and it s quite true Very few parts of the first half of the book I thought expressed themselves with much brilliance, fuel for the imagination so to speak Whether it s to do with the writing style or the pace with which the characters move from one adventure to the next I can t tell, perhaps a mixture of the two and some but it s certainly lacking The odd thing is though I didn t feel it detracted from the elegance and power of the novel Far from it, you soon begin to learn that anything could be cropping up around the next corner and it s likely to be far detached from what was expected.Very long and complex book but I m very much looking forward to reading the 2nd part in the near future Brilliant

  5. Renato Magalhães Rocha says:

    This was my second time reading Don Quixote Original review to be read clicking here This was my second time reading Don Quixote Original review to be read clicking here

  6. Marius says:

    Probably the best book in the world Don Quixote voted best book ever Don Quixote is the world s best book say the world s top authors The top 100 books of all time Dostoevsky on Don Quixote There is nothing in lifepowerful than this piece of fiction It is still the final and the greatest expression of human thought, the most bitter irony that a human is capable of expressing and if the world came to an end and people were asked somewhere there Well, did you un Probably the best book in the world Don Quixote voted best book ever Don Quixote is the world s best book say the world s top authors The top 100 books of all time Dostoevsky on Don Quixote There is nothing in lifepowerful than this piece of fiction It is still the final and the greatest expression of human thought, the most bitter irony that a human is capable of expressing and if the world came to an end and people were asked somewhere there Well, did you understand anything about your life on earth and draw any conclusion from it a person could silently hand over Don Quixote Here is my conclusion about life Can you condemn me for it Diary of a Writer

  7. Dimitris says:

    Adorably old fashioned and old style baroque comedy, yet I sense traces of Modernism beneath the surface, especialy in how our hero s madness somehow isn t confining him from interacting with people I prefered to linger on the fun and on the Chivalry though, on the endless wonderful sub plots of endless characters Starting Book II imediately.

  8. Marie says:

    It s hard to classify and to explain what this book is about In all honesty, one could describe the plot basic points, and still not get a grasp of how complete this book is in every sense It has helped me to discover a love for this kind of reality, standing in the thin line between dream in reality, and the problems of knowledge among many other things One of the first books of this style I have had the pleasure of reading was Fran ois Rabelais, Pantagruel which for sure have some points It s hard to classify and to explain what this book is about In all honesty, one could describe the plot basic points, and still not get a grasp of how complete this book is in every sense It has helped me to discover a love for this kind of reality, standing in the thin line between dream in reality, and the problems of knowledge among many other things One of the first books of this style I have had the pleasure of reading was Fran ois Rabelais, Pantagruel which for sure have some points in common with this one, though Cervantes first part of Don Quixote reliesin violence rather than sexual content, there s a lot of grotesque elements, even in language and references to popular culture The doubt between what s real and what s fiction is not only shown in Don Quixote s case, but in many characters belonging to lower sectors of society, as in the continuous debate concerning the meaning of literature, considering that its content is often taken as true by just being approved by royal authorities.The constant elements of reality and contemporary events, as well as references to the life of the authors and the depiction of the moslim world give it a richness hardly seen in other books There s a lot of importance in love s role in all its forms, from marriage to loyalty as expected in a friendship The female characters are strong and decided, willing to accomplish their goals, from making a man marry them as they accorded, to successfully convert to Catholicism for love to the Virgin Mary One of the most interesting features is that, we manage to infer that while Don Quixote s actions have his madness as their origin, they aren t a product of bad intentions The often recurring conflicts in which Don Quixote ends up beaten by the world who refuses to take part in his old mannered, highly romanticized vision of knights and their lives, bring a source of hilarity but also allows us to question ourselves how do react before conflicting points of view present in our communication with others Maybe all of us are a bit like Don Quixote or a bit like those who deem him wrong, not being able to put ourselves in some other person s place

  9. Julie Bell says:

    I understand that it has its place among historic literary devices and I respect it for that With that being said, it would have been better at half its length I got the point early on and at some point the theme repetition became tedious.

  10. Kyriakos Sorokkou says:

    While having a break at the cafeteria a nice morning in May, I was surfing on my phone and discovered Public book Stores in Cyprus were celebrating their 5 years of online presence, with really low prices This 1st volume was just 10 from the 26 it is originally, so I bought it with no further ado.I bought the 2nd volume on September 29, my name day and possibly Miguel de Cervantes birthday.The low price was the first reason I bought this While having a break at the cafeteria a nice morning in May, I was surfing on my phone and discovered Public book Stores in Cyprus were celebrating their 5 years of online presence, with really low prices This 1st volume was just 10 from the 26 it is originally, so I bought it with no further ado.I bought the 2nd volume on September 29, my name day and possibly Miguel de Cervantes birthday.The low price was the first reason I bought this edition.The second reason was that this volume and the next are illustrated by my favourite surrealist painter Salvador Dali, also from Spain.With 31 coloured and 37 black and white illustrations if I counted correctly.This was the last book I read last September and the first in October.In other words I read the 1st volume the last week of September and the 2nd volume in the first week of October I read 1705 pages in 15 days which is a really good reading pace.I usually prefer to read a book in one paperback volume instead of being divided in one or two, and in hardback but with Don Quixote I made an exception because of price, Dali, and because they were originally published separately by a ten year difference.If Don Quixote wasn t as successful as it was when it was published in 1605, with 6reprints in the same year, and translations in English 1612 and French 1614 Cervantes wouldn t have written the next part He felt that the 1st part was complete and a stand alone Both parts are now published in one volume regardless of their 10 year gapThus, because of the 1st part s success he decided to write and publish the 2nd part, in 1615 a year before his death, the same date with the great English playwright William Shakespeare, 23 April 1616, a date celebrated as World Book Day.The second part of my review continues on the second part of Don Quixote, here

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