Looking for the Lost



Looking for the Lost Traveling by foot through mountains and villages, Alan Booth found a Japan far removed from the stereotypes familiar to Westerners Whether retracing the footsteps of ancient warriors or detailing the encroachments of suburban sprawl, he unerringly finds the telling detail, the unexpected transformation, the everyday drama that brings this remote world to life on the page Looking for the Lost is full of personalities, from friendly gangsters to mischievous children to the author himself, an expatriate who found in Japan both his true home and dogged exile Wry, witty, sometimes angry, always eloquent, Booth is a uniquely perceptive guide Looking for the Lost is a technicolor journey into the heart of a nation Perhaps even significant, it is the self portrait of one man, Alan Booth, exquisitely painted in the twilight of his own life. Best Read [ Looking for the Lost ] By [ Alan Booth ] – bluevapours.co.uk

Alan Booth was born in London in 1946 and traveled to Japan in 1970 to study Noh theater He stayed, working as a writer and film critic, until his death from cancer in 1993.

↠ Library information on services Looking for the Lost  ePUB Author Alan Booth – bluevapours.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 389 pages
  • Looking for the Lost
  • Alan Booth
  • English
  • 19 February 2018
  • 1568361483

10 thoughts on “Looking for the Lost

  1. Patrick McCoy says:

    I was really impressed with Alan Booth s Roads to Sata and was relishing the chance to read his follow up, Looking For The Lost 1995 And again I was impressed, the first section, Tsugaru is Booth s retracing the path of Aomori author Osamu Dazai, who was famous for his writing and booze fueled life and many suicides attempts one of which, was successful The name of Dazai s book that Booth uses as his guide of the region was Return to Tsugaru Travels of a Purple Tramp, which gave Both poin I was really impressed with Alan Booth s Roads to Sata and was relishing the chance to read his follow up, Looking For The Lost 1995 And again I was impressed, the first section, Tsugaru is Booth s retracing the path of Aomori author Osamu Dazai, who was famous for his writing and booze fueled life and many suicides attempts one of which, was success...

  2. Azabu says:

    Enjoying it so much that I m reading it v e r y s l o w l y

  3. Judith says:

    This book is an amazing travel account.Booth is a walker, no matter the weather, no matter how awful the road He speaks Japanese, he s intelligent and talkative and he talks to the people he meets The experiences he makes good, bad, funny, strange are shared in wonderfully engaging language There is the odd introspection or memory of former visits or happenings in his life, too It doesn t happen often and, because Booth comes across as such a down to earth guy this added to the charm of th This book is an amazing travel account.Booth is a walker, no matter the weather, no matter how awful the road He speaks Japanese, he s intelligent and talkative and he talks to the people he meets The experiences he makes good, bad, funny, strange are shared in wonderfully engaging language There is the odd introspection or memory of former visits or happenings in his life, too It doesn t happen often and, because Bo...

  4. Kenneth says:

    Wow This guy can write He s not looking for a picture postcard Japan He s looking at the country that s in front of him at a walking pace, talking to the people he meets and letting you in on it He doesn t wrap up things in neat bows, this isn t some memoir disguised as travel writing It s detailed, subtle, earthy The author died too young, and knowing that cast a sadness over the reading of this book, gave it depth and shadows it might otherwise not have had It will take me a while to pr Wow This guy can write He s not looking for a picture postcard Japan He s looking at the country that s in front of him at a walking pace, talking to the people he meets and letting you in on it He doesn t wrap up things in neat bows, this isn t some memoir disguised as travel writing It s detailed, subtle, earthy The author died too ...

  5. Stephen Douglas Rowland says:

    Honestly, there is quite a bit of excellent Japanese cultural stuff present here, but I found the author s tone consistently condescending Further, the first part of the book is barelythan an extended tirade against Osamu Dazai To dislike t...

  6. PJ Ebbrell says:

    I loved The Road to Sata, but struggled a bit with this one The last quarter of the book was brilliant I got a bit lost looking for Saigo, but now I have found Jdrama about the time and a book on his life I suspect I will re read this at some point.

  7. Nami says:

    The library is closed, so I needed to borrow something for the plane ride from my mother s limited english language library This book is so damn big I really don t want to carry it, but what freakin choice do I have Anyway, I liked his first book when I read it back in my high school days.Later I soon realized that this was actually the book I d read back in the day Luckily I was given two books to read while I was away so basically I just carried it around up and down the state of Californ The library is closed, so I needed to borrow something for the plane ride from my mother s limited english language library This book is so damn big I really don t want to carry it, but what freakin choice do I have Anyway, I liked his first book when I read it back in my high school days.Later I soon realized that this was actually the book I d read back in the day Luckily I was given two books to read while I was away so basically I just carried it around up and down the state of California for no apparent reason.here is why you should read this book It makes this similar astute observations often and as wittily, but I m not about to transcribe the whole book Daruma is the Japanese name for Bodhidharma, the Indian sage whom legend credits with having introduced Zen Buddhism to China He is said to have meditated for nine years in a cave and during that time his arms and...

  8. Bob says:

    The book records three journeys on foot in remote parts of Japan vaguely shadowing journeys by famous historical characters Dazai Osamu, a popular writer from the 1940 s Saigo Takamori, who completed a brilliant retreat after a failed rebellion in 1877 and the survivors of the Taira who fled after the events in the Tale of the Heike. Rather than the exotic, the author was hoping to find echoes of the past in ordinary modern life, and though largely unsuccessful, the narrative presents brief The book records three journeys on foot in remote parts of Japan vaguely shadowing journeys by famous historical characters Dazai Osamu, a popular writer from the 1940 s Saigo Takamori, who completed a brilliant retreat after a failed rebellion in 1877 and the survivors of the Taira who fled after the events in the Tale of the Heike. Rather than the exotic, the author was hoping to find echoes of the past in ordinary modern life, and though largely unsuccessful, the narrative presents brief portraits of men and women, whose character and eccentricities are as various as anywhere else on earth But in the minds of most of the weekend tourists who visit these old tows and hamlets, the past is a generously amorphous fog What is old is old there is no need to bother oneself overmuch about causes and resultsAll history, even or rather especially the recent history of the 1930s and 1940s, is a tangle bes...

  9. Dogsandbooks says:

    DPL 915.2 A lovely travelogue about walking through modern Japan He was retracing the steps of a particular Samuri warrior that got a little tedious But very interesting to read his description of the countryside of which you must travel a very long way to really see Lots of description of the endless ugly architecture, souvenir stands and restaurants of all varieties that dot the landscape A great description of how culture like Noh theater is fossilized, preserved without change o DPL 915.2 A lovely travelogue about walking through modern Japan He was retracing the steps of a particular Samuri warrior that got a little tedious But very interesting to read his description of the countryside of which you must travel a very long way to really see Lots of description of the endless ugly architecture, souvenir stands and restaurants of all varieties that dot the landscape A great description of h...

  10. Ward says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book, an enthralling mix of Japanese history, geography, culture, and witty observations of numerous individuals encountered during the course of the three recorded journeys The book demanded a careful, unhurried reading with a correspondingly rich sense of reward The ending paragraphs were i...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *