Looking for the Lost: Journeys Through a Vanishing Japan




      Looking for the Lost: Journeys Through a Vanishing Japan
Traveling by foot through mountains and villages, Alan Booth found a Japan far removed from the stereotypes familiar to Westerners Whether retracing the footsteps of ancient warriors or detailing the encroachments of suburban sprawl, he unerringly finds the telling detail, the unexpected transformation, the everyday drama that brings this remote world to life on the page Looking for the Lost is full of personalities, from friendly gangsters to mischievous children to the author himself, an expatriate who found in Japan both his true home and dogged exile Wry, witty, sometimes angry, always eloquent, Booth is a uniquely perceptive guide Looking for the Lost is a technicolor journey into the heart of a nation Perhaps even significant, it is the self portrait of one man, Alan Booth, exquisitely painted in the twilight of his own life. Free Download Books Looking for the Lost: Journeys Through a Vanishing Japan by Alan Booth – bluevapours.co.uk

Alan Booth was born in London in 1946 and traveled to Japan in 1970 to study Noh theater He stayed, working as a writer and film critic, until his death from cancer in 1993.


      Looking for the Lost: Journeys Through a Vanishing Japan
 By Alan Booth IBN : 1568361483 Format : Paperback – bluevapours.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 400 pages
  • Looking for the Lost: Journeys Through a Vanishing Japan
  • Alan Booth
  • English
  • 05 January 2017
  • 1568361483

10 thoughts on “ Looking for the Lost: Journeys Through a Vanishing Japan

  1. Patrick McCoy says:

    I was really impressed with Alan Booth s Roads to Sata and was relishing the chance to read his follow up, Looking For The Lost 1995 And again I was impressed, the first section, Tsugaru is Booth s retracing the path of Aomori author Osamu Dazai, who was famous for his writing and booze fueled life and many suicides attempts one of which, was successful The name of Dazai s book that Booth uses as his guide of the region was Return to Tsugaru Travels of a Purple Tramp, which gave Both poin I was really impressed with Alan Booth s Roads to Sata and was relishing the chance to read his follow up, Looking For The Lost 1995 And again I was impressed, the first section, Tsugaru is Booth s retracing the path of Aomori author Osamu Dazai, who was famous for his writing and booze fueled life and many suicides attempts one of which, was successful The name of Dazai s book that Booth uses as his guide of the region was Return to Tsugaru Travels of a Purple Tramp, which gave Both points of reference even though that trip was undertaken 50 years earlier In the book Booth tells a waitress at the inn that was once Dazai s home that he wasn t particularly a fan and I can believe it I m not such a huge fan of the selfish miserable man either I think it was merely a good excuse for him to explore thi...

  2. Azabu says:

    Enjoying it so much that I m reading it v e r y s l o w l y

  3. J says:

    This book is an amazing travel account.Booth is a walker, no matter the weather, no matter how awful the road He speaks Japanese, he s intelligent and talkative and he talks to the people he meets The experiences he makes good, bad, funny, strange are shared in wonderfully engaging language There is the odd introspection or memory of ...

  4. Stephen Douglas Rowland says:

    Honestly, there is quite a bit of excellent Japanese cultural stuff present here, but I found the author s tone consistently condescending Further, the first part of the book is barelythan an extended tirade against Osamu Dazai To ...

  5. Michiel Nicolaï says:

    An ok book, like his other work Roads to Sata.Still just the same a bit repetitive.Even so he gives some nice insights in Japanese culture.For example his explanation of the crux of Japanese literature on the brevity or human glory and the eternal sadness with which the world is charged To bespecific a reference from a short story of Akutagawa s life of a foolish man ah what is a human life, a drop of dew a flash of lightning This is sad, so sad Reading these insights makes me cont An ok book, like his other work Roads to Sata.Still just the same a bit repetitive.Even so he gives some nice insights in Japanese culture.For example his explanation of the crux of Japanese literature on the brevity or human glory and the eternal sadness with which the worl...

  6. Kenneth says:

    Wow This guy can write He s not looking for a picture postcard Japan He s looking at the country that s in front of him at a walking pace, talking to the people he meets and letting you in on it He doesn t wrap up things in neat bows, this isn t some memoir disguised as travel writing It s detailed, subtle, earthy The author died too young, and knowing that cast a sadness over the reading of this book, gave it depth and shadows it might otherwise not have had It will take me a while to pr Wow This guy can write He s not looking for a picture postcard Japan He s looking at the country that s in front of him at a walking pace, talking to the people he meets and letting you in on it He doesn t wrap up things in neat bows, this isn t...

  7. Maria Kojdecka says:

    I managed to read 260 pages put of 385 anc I really couldn t stand a single wordIt s not a story of a meditative walk It s a story of drinking beer and having sore feet and wet clothes It would have been interesting if it had been 150 pages shorter Without descriptions of being bored and tired ...

  8. E says:

    Could not get through the first chapter Painfully boring.

  9. PJ Ebbrell says:

    I loved The Road to Sata, but struggled a bit with this one The last quarter of the book was brilliant I got a bit lost looking for Saigo, but now I have found Jdrama about the time and a book on his life I suspect I will re read this at some point.

  10. Nami says:

    The library is closed, so I needed to borrow something for the plane ride from my mother s limited english language library This book is so damn big I really don t want to carry it, but what freakin choice do I have Anyway, I liked his first book when I read it back in my high school days.Later I soon realized that this was actually the book I d read back in the day Luckily I was given two books to read while I was away so basically I just carried it around up and down the state of Californ The library is closed, so I needed to borrow something for the plane ride from my mother s limited english language library This book is so damn big I really don t want to carry it, but what freakin choice do I have Anyway, I liked his first book when I read it back in my high school days.Later I soon realized that this was actually the book I d read ba...

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