Before European Hegemony



Before European Hegemony In this important study, Abu Lughod presents a groundbreaking reinterpretation of global economic evolution, arguing that the modern world economy had its roots not in the sixteenth century, as is widely supposed, but in the thirteenth century economy a system far different from the European world system which emerged from it Using the city as the working unit of analysis, Before European Hegemony provides a new paradigm for understanding the evolution of world systems by tracing the rise of a system that, at its peak in the opening decades of the 14th century, involved a vast region stretching between northwest Europe and China Writing in a clear and lively style, Abu Lughod explores the reasons for the eventual decay of this system and the rise of European hegemony. Best Read Books Before European Hegemony By Janet L. Abu-Lughod – bluevapours.co.uk

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Before European Hegemony book, this is one of the most wanted Janet L. Abu-Lughod author readers around the world.

Before European Hegemony  By Janet L. Abu-Lughod IBN : 0195067746 Format : Paperback – bluevapours.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 464 pages
  • Before European Hegemony
  • Janet L. Abu-Lughod
  • English
  • 17 September 2017
  • 0195067746

10 thoughts on “Before European Hegemony

  1. AC says:

    It is considered bad form to criticize others, esp on a site like goodreads, so I will do so without mentioning any names An earlier reviewer of this book began by complaining about how this book stinks of post modernism It s an odor that the author could have done without references to chaos theory, anti Kuhnian analysis and an attack on euro centrism so strident that it borders on apoplexy, are, I think, undue Though the reviewer went on to give this book five stars, these comments almos It is considered bad form to criticize others, esp on a site like goodreads, so I will do so without mentioning any names An earlier reviewer of this boo...

  2. Hadrian says:

    The Eurasian continent consisted of multiple overlapping regional networks of trade, stretching from Europe to China Europe was by no means predominant at this time, just a periphery in this broader system of international trade Those areas in Europe with greater proximity to trade routes Genoa, Venice, the Byzantine Empire received much economic benefit In order, Abu Lughod discusses the Troyes and Champagne trade fairs of France, Bruges and Ghent, Genoa and Venice in modern Italy, the Mon The Eurasian continent consisted of multiple overlapping regional networks of trade, stretching from Europe to China Europe was by no means predominant at this time, just a periphery in this broader system of international trade Those areas in Europe with greater proximity to trade routes Genoa, Venice, the Byzantine Empire received much economic benefit In order, Abu Lughod discusses the Troyes and Champagne trade fairs of France, Bruges and Ghent, Genoa and Venice in modern Italy, the Mongolian Empire and its overland routes, Baghdad and its st...

  3. Bryn Hammond says:

    Much cited I was afraid to sit down and read the actual thing for years, because I m not an economics person Turns out there was nothing to be afraid of quite an easy read for the curious The most cogent, digestible view of the Italian merchant cities connections with the Mongol...

  4. J.M. Hushour says:

    A somewhat moot argument now, but at the time, Abu Lughod s work was in the vanguard of synthesizing historiography in a way that made sense, namely by pointing up the relative insignificance of Europe for much of history.The main idea is pretty straightforward an archipelago of relatively non aggressive, culturally diverse areas reaching from Egypt to China s eastern seaboard once formed a tidy world system that did not have much to do with backwater Europe This system collapsed around the 14 A somewhat moot argument now, but at the time, Abu Lughod s work was in the vanguard of synthesizing historiography in a way that made sense, namely by pointing up the relative insignificance of Europe for much of history.The main idea is pretty straightforward an archipelago of relatively non aggressive, culturally diverse areas reaching from Egypt to China s eastern seaboard once formed a tidy world system that did not have much to do with backwater Europ...

  5. Dewey says:

    In Before European Hegemony, Janet Abu Lughod questions the assumption that European dominance in the 16th century occurred by necessity By assessing regional power and influence, Abu Lughod proves that between 1250 and 1350 the East and the West equaled one another in economic strength The shift of power to the West in subsequent centuries occurred not because of factors predetermined by Western dominance, but rather because the Eastern system left a vacuum of power that European countries we In Before European Hegemony, Janet Abu Lughod questions the assumption that European dominance in the 16th century occurred by necessity By assessing region...

  6. Jon says:

    Before I elaborate on my praise let me say, first of all, that this book stinks of post modernism It s an odor that the author could have done without references to chaos theory, anti Kuhnian analysis and an attack on euro centrism so strident that it borders on apoplexy, are, I think, undue The author could have had all of her conclusions without the facile effort to jazz up the narrative Even , I think it does her argument a disservice as post modern ideas wane the author s arguments, Before I elaborate on my praise let me say, first of all, that this book stinks of post modernism It s an odor that the author could have done without references to chaos theory, anti Kuhnian analysis and an attack on euro centrism so strident that it borders on apoplexy, are, I think, undue The author could have had all of her conclusions without the facile effort to jazz up the narrative Even , I think it does her argument a disservice as post modern ideas wane the author s arguments, bound needlessly as they are to these ideas,...

  7. Victoria says:

    Argues that European dominance of the modern world system dated to the 16th century was not the result of any particular qualities inherent in European civilization Rather, it developed out of a preexisting world system that flourished in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, over which Europeans were able to claim dominance as a result of decline in other economic zones i.e the Middle East and Asia A really fascinating look at the medieval economy, incorporating regional case studies wit Argues that European...

  8. John says:

    Abu Lughod s argument here so logical and readable she tells the reader exactly what she is going to prove and how she is going to prove it, and then she builds her case piece by piece until it all seems inarguable One wonders if perhaps the fact that she was moving into the realm of history from a social science background might have been beneficial Her willingness to lay out her case plainly is refreshing.There was, she argues, a world system of trade that predated by several centuries the Abu Lughod s argument here so logical and readable she tells the reader exactly what she is going to prove and how she is going to prove it, and then she builds her case piece by piece until it all seems inarguable One wonders if perhaps the fact that she was moving into the realm of history from a social science background might have been beneficial Her willingness to lay out her case plainly is refreshing.There was, she argues, a world system of trade that predated by several centuries the modern world system of Immanue...

  9. Jackson Cyril says:

    A very important book Abu Lughod presents a world system of trade which existed a century before Braudel s famous 14th century one and,importantly, shows how this earlier trade network had its power nexus in the East, with the Arabs, Indians and Chinese playing a huge role and Europe barely factorin...

  10. Colin says:

    This is a must read for anyone who teaches AP World History, or for anyone who is a student of history This book takes a world systems approach to looking at why the West rose and why the East declined.

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