Sold

Sold❴PDF / Epub❵ ☉ Sold Author Patricia McCormick – Bluevapours.co.uk Lakshmi is a thirteen year old girl who lives with her family in a small hut in the mountains of Nepal Her family is desperately poor, but her life is full of simple pleasures, like raising her black Lakshmi is a thirteen year old girl who lives with her family in a small hut in the mountains of Nepal Her family is desperately poor, but her life is full of simple pleasures, like raising her black and white speckled goat, and having her mother brush her hair by the light of an oil lamp But when the harsh Himalayan monsoons wash away all that remains of the family s crops, Lakshmi s stepfather says she must leave home and take a job to support her family He introduces her to a glamorous stranger who tells her she will find her a job as a maid working for a wealthy woman in the city Glad to be able to help, Lakshmi undertakes the long journey to India and arrives at Happiness House full of hope But she soon learns the unthinkable truth she has been Sold into prostitution An old woman named Mumtaz rules the brothel with cruelty and cunning She tells Lakshmi that she is trapped there until she can pay off her family s debt then cheats Lakshmi of her meager earnings so that she can never leave Lakshmi s life becomes a nightmare from which she cannot escape Still, she lives by her mother s words Simply to endure is to triumph and gradually, she forms friendships with the other girls that enable her to survive in this terrifying new world Then the day comes when she must make a decision will she risk everything for a chance to reclaim her life Written in spare and evocative vignettes, this powerful novel renders a world that is as unimaginable as it is real, and a girl who not only survives but triumphs.

Patricia McCormick is a journalist and writer She graduated from Rosemont College in , followed by an MS from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in and an MFA from New School University in Her first novel for teens was Cut, about a young woman who self injures herself This was followed by My Brother s Keeper in , about a boy struggling with his brother s addiction and Sold in Her awards include the American Library Association Best Book of the Year, New York Public Library Best Book for the Teenaged and the Children s Literature Council s Choice She has written for The New York Times, Parents Magazine, The New York Times Book Review, Ladies Home Journal, Town Country, More, Reader s Digest, Mademoiselle and other publications and has been an adjunct professor of journalism at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and an instructor of creative writing at the New School University She lives in New York with two children, a husband and two cats.

Hardcover  ¾ Sold MOBI ✓
    iOS for the iPad is the biggest iOS release ever who tells her she will find her a job as a maid working for a wealthy woman in the city Glad to be able to help, Lakshmi undertakes the long journey to India and arrives at Happiness House full of hope But she soon learns the unthinkable truth she has been Sold into prostitution An old woman named Mumtaz rules the brothel with cruelty and cunning She tells Lakshmi that she is trapped there until she can pay off her family s debt then cheats Lakshmi of her meager earnings so that she can never leave Lakshmi s life becomes a nightmare from which she cannot escape Still, she lives by her mother s words Simply to endure is to triumph and gradually, she forms friendships with the other girls that enable her to survive in this terrifying new world Then the day comes when she must make a decision will she risk everything for a chance to reclaim her life Written in spare and evocative vignettes, this powerful novel renders a world that is as unimaginable as it is real, and a girl who not only survives but triumphs."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 268 pages
  • Sold
  • Patricia McCormick
  • English
  • 18 October 2019
  • 0786851716

10 thoughts on “Sold

  1. Petra-X says:

    Beautifully written with much heartache for these young girls who are sold into prostitution by their families Sometimes they are sold because of extreme poverty and all money must be spent on the Males of the family But sometimes, as in the book, they are sold just because the Male wants a new winter coat and a girl is just money wasted in feeding her when she could be sold for cash and no expenses in the future The saddest part of the book is the girls weren t working for money even But Beautifully written with much heartache for these young girls who are sold into prostitution by their families Sometimes they are sold because of extreme poverty and all money must be spent on the Males of the family But sometimes, as in the book, they are sold just because the Male wants a new winter coat and a girl is just money wasted in feeding her when she could be sold for cash and no expenses in the future The saddest part of the book is the girls weren t working for money even But were really enslaved in form of bonded labour until they could pay of their debts They had to pay back the madame their price, the costs of bringing them, all the agents, bribes, money paid to their father or uncle who sold them Then at the brothel they had to pay for every crumb they ever ate, dress they wore, and even for their bedding where they lay down to get screwed by the customer as well as the madame Add the madame s profit on top of that and they were stuck until their looks had gone and she no longer wanted them Escape was scarcely an option If they didn t get away they would be brought by captors expecting a good monetary reward and their punishment would be extreme, sometimes even to the point of disfigurement Lesser crimes, like keeping a diary, or talking to someone about their plight brought the fear of a favourite punishment cut up hot peppers thrust into the girl s vagina which was then plugged for some hours There are American rescue missions but the girls were told these white devils would do the worst things to them that were beyond anything they could imagine so they lied to them that they were happy There were American customers to, but they couldn t care less, they were just hiring a prostitute Eventually the heroine, if she can be called that, does escape to an American mission It s quite a good part of the book, she makes friends with an itinerate tea seller who gets fired but comes back to tell her the truth of the missions This is another chance at life But the reality, outside of a book, is that these girls are nobodies, no one wants to marry them or employ them It s the same everywhere, whores are the lowest of the low even if they were only that because they were forced into it.These missions ought to offer these girls the chance of immigration into America There they would be educated and from then on their families would be free of the poverty and culture that sold girls like the saying,..A girl is like a goat Good when giving milk and babies, but no need to cry when it s time to make stew view spoiler Hence, selling daughters into prostitution and the murders that are euphemistically called honour killings hide spoiler

  2. Ms.Whitehead says:

    AM I PRETTY In the days after the hugging man leaves, I consider myself in the mirror My plain self, not the self wearing lipstick and eyeliner and a flimsy dress.Sometimes I see a girl who is growing into womanhood Other days I see a girl growing old before her time.It doesn t matter, of course Because no one will ever want me now.Lakshmi is thirteen years old She lives a simple, albeit impoverished, existence with with her Ama, infant sibling and gambling addicted stepfather in a Nepalese AM I PRETTY In the days after the hugging man leaves, I consider myself in the mirror My plain self, not the self wearing lipstick and eyeliner and a flimsy dress.Sometimes I see a girl who is growing into womanhood Other days I see a girl growing old before her time.It doesn t matter, of course Because no one will ever want me now.Lakshmi is thirteen years old She lives a simple, albeit impoverished, existence with with her Ama, infant sibling and gambling addicted stepfather in a Nepalese village buried deep in the Himalayan mountains She is a loving and obedient daughter and the best student in her class, but when a monsoon comes, devastating her family s home and the crops they rely on for sustenance, her simple life takes a catastrophic turn In order to compensate for the family s crippling loss, Lakshmi s stepfather who likens little girls to goats, Good as long as she gives you milk and butter..but not worth crying over when it s time to make stew decides to sell Lakshmi away to a Calcutta brothel for the paltry sum of four hundred dollars.Early in the novel, Lakshmi s Ama gives her this warning it is a woman s fate to suffer and simply to endure is to triumph Told through a series of spare, free verse vignettes, Lakshim s story is devastating, and yet somehow she endures, which considering the myriad horrors she experiences is most definitely a triumph.Before writing Sold, Patricia McCormick traveled to Nepal and India, interviewing both the families who sell their children some intentionally, some because they were tricked by unscrupulous traffickers and the children who have been sold into the trade Thanks to her first hand interviews and observations, Sold although fiction feels intensely real Lakshmi s story could be that of any one of the 400,000 children currently in bondage, working off their bloated debts in Indian brothels, and it was that realism mixed with a beautifully simplistic style of storytelling that led me to devour this novel in one sitting, despite the fact that every single page found a new way to break my heart

  3. Elyse Walters says:

    Young Adult book one sitting read for adults I finished this a couple of days ago We are taken into a dark underworld it s clear many victims were made to endure horrific acts This isn t an unfamiliar storyyet that doesn t negate its power Lakshmi is a young Nepalese girl Lakshmi tells the story with a sweet softness that breaks our hearts Lakshmi gives brief short descriptions well told in vignettes.Her wish to buy her mother a tin roof like other neighbors have on Young Adult book one sitting read for adults I finished this a couple of days ago We are taken into a dark underworld it s clear many victims were made to endure horrific acts This isn t an unfamiliar storyyet that doesn t negate its power Lakshmi is a young Nepalese girl Lakshmi tells the story with a sweet softness that breaks our hearts Lakshmi gives brief short descriptions well told in vignettes.Her wish to buy her mother a tin roof like other neighbors have on their huts.to make her mother happy.to be with her mother.Her Family is poor..Her stepfather gambles away their money and drinks.Lakshmi gets her monthly period mother tries to hide her, warn her, teaches her to stay clear of all men which only lasts for so longThe stepfather sells Lakshmi to a brothel of course she was tricked and lied to A son will always be a son, they say But a girl is like a goat Good as long as she gives milk and butter Not worth crying over when it s time to make stew By focusing on one single girl made this story very personal but it s ALL PERSONAL..Sex trafficking is horrendous bigger than our hearts, soul, mind, and spirit can contain FRICKIN AWFUL so sad and makes us angry ANGRY The author must be acknowledged she spent a great deal of time in India researching true stories Names have been changed but this small book was taken from true facts from real people s lives If I were going to introduce this book to a young pre teen I would not just hand over the book..I d read it with them.allowing time for discussion Thank you Nat for the book recommendation

  4. else fine says:

    1 This book conveys less about the triumph of the human spirit andabout how Americans fix everything In tone it read exactly like an early missionary novel.2 I wish people would only write novels in verse if the verse actually served some purpose in the plot or the development of the character, or if the verse was good In Sold it s simply a weird affectation 3 The fact brought up as an afterthought in the end notes, that Nepalese women are fighting back by educating young village wom 1 This book conveys less about the triumph of the human spirit andabout how Americans fix everything In tone it read exactly like an early missionary novel.2 I wish people would only write novels in verse if the verse actually served some purpose in the plot or the development of the character, or if the verse was good In Sold it s simply a weird affectation 3 The fact brought up as an afterthought in the end notes, that Nepalese women are fighting back by educating young village women and patrolling the borders themselves, is by farinspirational and interesting than the acts of resistance in the story itself A book about that would be fascinating A topic this horrifying deserved a better book

  5. Vessey says:

    TRIGGER WARNING It is best for people particularly sensitive toward the subject of sexual abuse child molestation to avoid reading any further Caution is advised And so, Love, you launch in vain your insane onslaught since it will be said to see me fall yet not surrender that you managed to kill but failed to conquer.Juana Inez de la CruzWhen beautiful things are broken, screams begin When beautiful things are taken, horror begins When beautiful minds are bended, there is no tomorrow o TRIGGER WARNING It is best for people particularly sensitive toward the subject of sexual abuse child molestation to avoid reading any further Caution is advised And so, Love, you launch in vain your insane onslaught since it will be said to see me fall yet not surrender that you managed to kill but failed to conquer.Juana Inez de la CruzWhen beautiful things are broken, screams begin When beautiful things are taken, horror begins When beautiful minds are bended, there is no tomorrow or yesterday or today There is only a place a million miles away melting in the darkness, seeming like home, but you know it isn t It is the death of a broken mindAt first, these recollections came unbidden Soon I had to work to recall them But eventually they became threadbare, thin as the blanket on my bed, until one day my heart nearly stopped when I could not summon them up Still, there is one image that I cannot forget, no matter how I try Trying to remember is like trying to clutch a handful of fog Trying to forget, like trying to hold back the monsoon When I was thirteen, I read a book called Princess A True Story Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia I felt so strongly about it that it changed my relationship with books forever Before that I wasn t that much of a reader Then I read Princess and ever since I haven t been able to stop Most of the people you will meet will tell you that they sympathize with women s fate, that they are appalled and that they wish it was different We all do However, with a part of myself I have always thought What does that help with We all talk and talk, but none of us can actually do anything Which is why I tend to avoid non fiction regarding certain matters Including this one Because it is too much of a reminder that I can t do a damn thing I feel too much like a voyeur, someone who gets let in on something extremely personal, yet, someone who is merely a spectator It feels wrong to get to know so intimately someone s greatest pain and at the same time to stay passive, to not be able to even say to those you are reading or hearing about I m sorry You deserve better You only stay with the feeling of sad eyes, accusing eyes, blood shot eyes full of pain and anger following you everywhere, whose gaze transfixes you and haunts you from far way and lips whose silence screams louder than the loudest scream Those are women who have no voice and who have no right to lift their eyes up They say the woman is a burden, the woman is a sinner, the woman is inferior, the woman is a witch, the woman is weakA son will always be a son, they say But a girl is like a goat Good as long as she gives you milk and butter But not worth crying over when it s time to make a stew Why, I say, must women suffer so This has always been our fate, she says Simply to endure, she says, is to triumph And it is only those of us who truly know what it means to be a woman and you don t have to be one to, it is enough to be a human being with intelligence and compassion that know that the woman is a treasure I am not among the most impressive representatives of my gender and I certainly didn t do much with the privileges I had the luck to be born with, ones I know that those women would have made a much better use of, so I probably don t have the right to speak on all women s behalf, but what makes me do so is that despite all my personal failings and faults I still have a sense of right and wrong, I still care Lakshmi is a 13 year old girl who gets sold to a pleasure house by her step father who can hardly imagine life without having enough money for gambling and buying himself new coats She is undone She is humiliated and abused multiple times Physically and mentally She is insulted, threatened, beaten, raped, starved, mutilatedI hurt I am torn and bleeding where the men have been I pray to the gods to make the hurting go away To make the burning and the aching and the bleeding stop Music and laughter come from the room next door Horns and shouting come from the street below No one can hear me Not even the gods Before it starts, you hear a zipper baring its teeth, the sound of a shoe being kicked aside, the wincing of the mattress Once it starts, you hear the sound of horns bleating in the street, the vendor hawking his treats, or the pock of a ball But if you are lucky, you hear nothing Nothing but the clicking of the fan overhead, the steady ticking away of seconds until it is over Until it starts again I clench the sheets in my hands, for fear that I will pound them to death with my fists I grit my teeth, for fear that I will bite through their skin to their very bones I squeeze my eyes closed tight, for fear that I will see what has actually happened to me Somehow, I am outside myself, marveling at this pain, a thing so formidable it has color and shape Fantastic red, then yellow, starbursts of agony explode in my head Then there is a blinding whiteness, and then blackness Somehow, without warning, the pain is gone A new pain takes its place She doesn t cry I have never been strong and this story made me wonder what I would do in her place Would I suddenly find an unsuspected, latent strength in myself, would I transform into a brave, courageous woman, would I in the end be stronger for it, would it make me see my life and myself differently or I would I get out of it broken and unrecognizable, barely resembling human, dead on the inside, defeated and hurt beyond repair I was no older than Lakshmi when I faced what it means sometimes to be a woman, but I faced it from the comfort of my home, in the pages of a book Unlike all those other women, even children, because this is what Lakshmi is A child at 13 But that may not always be the case And would this make me bigger or smaller I was deeply touched by the way Lakshmi bore herself through the whole thing She doesn t stay defiant and fierce, resisting until the very end She bends and tries to do the best out of the worst situation she could have found herself in But she also preserves her compassion and her hope Her humanityA tear is running down my cheek It quivers a moment on the tip of my nose, then splashes onto my skirt, leaving a small, dark circle I have been beaten here, locked away, violated a hundred times and a hundred timesI have been starved and cheated, tricked and disgraced How odd it is that I am undone by the simple kindness of a small boy with a yellow pencil I was reluctant whether I should keep using the word humanity as equivalent of goodness, but as cruel and stupid humans are in some ways, they are also incredible in others, as Lakshmi herself shows And since I have been working on being less critical toward my fellow humans andopen minded, I choose to focus on human race s positives rather than its negatives, hoping that it can do the same for me.They call women the weaker sex Women are not weak Women are gentle And it is up to those that have power over them whether they will turn that gentleness into weakness, by taking advantage of it, by abusing and crushing it for pleasure and for profit or see the beauty in it, the strength that comes with it, the miracle that can be a woman who is loved, respected and protected Women might be physicallyvulnerable than men, but they can be as fierce lovers and protectors as any man, they feel the responsibilities bestowed on them as keenly and take them equally seriously In Jane Eyre Mr Rochester tells to JaneNever was anything at once so frail and so indomitable I could bend her with my finger and thumb and what good would it do if I bent, if I uptore, if I crushed her Consider that eye, defying me, withthan courage with a stern triumph It is you, spirit with will and energy, and virtue and purity that I want not alone your brittle frame Why should we use our strength to make others weaker When all you are left with is a bruised, abused, broken thing, merely a shell of a person, how does that make you strong There is no beauty in broken minds A strong person is one who can see past the veil, past the ostensible and primal A strong person is not the one who uses his strength to conquer, but one who shares it A strong person is not the one who uses his strengths to dominate, but who can see the strengths in others weaknesses and bring them to life I am ending this review by quoting my friend Jeffrey who says in his fantastic review of Finding Nouf She let me see the longing in the eyes peering from behind the veils They are beautiful caged birdslet them sing.17.09.2017Read count 1

  6. karen says:

    another book i m not sure gains a lot by being written in verse, unless it is just to slow the pacing down to better appreciate the horror the beginning pre sale parts were very beautifully descriptive, and then after that become very unbeautifully descriptive it s a rough subject matter that doesn t get disney fied until the end.

  7. AMEERA & says:

    Wow

  8. Katie B says:

    Lakshmi is a thirteen year old girl who lives with her family in Nepal She wants to help her family out financially by working as a maid in the city but she is sold into a life of prostitution by her stepfather This is a fictional story but is based on interviews the author conducted with aid workers and survivors themselves.This is a tough book to read but I highly recommend giving it a chance if you think you can handle the subject matter It is written in a simple, almost poetic way and yet Lakshmi is a thirteen year old girl who lives with her family in Nepal She wants to help her family out financially by working as a maid in the city but she is sold into a life of prostitution by her stepfather This is a fictional story but is based on interviews the author conducted with aid workers and survivors themselves.This is a tough book to read but I highly recommend giving it a chance if you think you can handle the subject matter It is written in a simple, almost poetic way and yet so much is conveyed It s like not a single word was wasted It s the type of book that will stay with me a long time as it is so haunting Lakshmi might be a fictional character but she is the voice of countless victims and this is a book well worth reading

  9. Heather says:

    What a powerful, haunting story Written in free verse from the perspective of a 13 year old Nepalese girl, who was sold from her mountain home to earn a living as a maid in the big city Lakshmi was saddened to leave her mother and her baby brother, but she was eager to earn a living so she could send money back to her family for necessities like clothing, food, and a new tin roof, for which they were in desperate need But when Lakshmi leaves, she is not taken to the big city to work as a maid What a powerful, haunting story Written in free verse from the perspective of a 13 year old Nepalese girl, who was sold from her mountain home to earn a living as a maid in the big city Lakshmi was saddened to leave her mother and her baby brother, but she was eager to earn a living so she could send money back to her family for necessities like clothing, food, and a new tin roof, for which they were in desperate need But when Lakshmi leaves, she is not taken to the big city to work as a maid, she is taken over the border into India where she is sold again to a brothel owner The fact that this type of cruelty exists today is appalling to me There were times when I was reading and I was thinking that this story took place years ago, and all the problems have, of course, been fixed by now But then when the author mentions the fact that the girls watched The Bold and the Beautiful on tv every day, and the American who came to the brothel brought a digital camera, you realize that the time frame for the story is present day The Author s Note at the end really brought to light the very real and current problem of sex trafficking in the world today I remember seeing a Lifetime movie about sex trafficking in another country cannot remember the name of the movie but I remember being greatly affected by it This book did the same thing for me It was beautifully written the vivid language brought this book to life, and the character descriptions and feelings were wrought so eloquently I highly recommend this book I cried for and cheered for Lakshmi I cannot imagine what she and others like her must go through Patricia McCormick captured this problem in real language that teenagers and adults will learn from and appreciate

  10. Kiwi says:

    I don t enjoy writing long reviews I did really enjoy this book As a warning, do not have ANY intentions of putting this book down I was reading it the night after a long flight from the US to the UK, and I thought, I ll read some before I go to bed I got to the halfway mark and thought, Well, what s the harm in reading someAnd then it was over Meaning I had spent far longer than I had intended to reading, and the book had been finished in two sittings one on the plane and one in I don t enjoy writing long reviews I did really enjoy this book As a warning, do not have ANY intentions of putting this book down I was reading it the night after a long flight from the US to the UK, and I thought, I ll read some before I go to bed I got to the halfway mark and thought, Well, what s the harm in reading someAnd then it was over Meaning I had spent far longer than I had intended to reading, and the book had been finished in two sittings one on the plane and one in bed.The poetic format manages to describe with beauty events that are horrible and unthinkable to the women I know The protagonist is incredibly easy to admire.The ending left me yearning for , which is just fine by me The fact that I was left wanting inspires me to get involvedand have aimmediate involvement with the stories out there like this

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