The Velvet Rope Economy



The Velvet Rope Economy From New York Times business reporter Nelson D Schwartz comes a gripping investigation of how a virtual velvet rope divides Americans in every arena of life, creating a friction free existence for those with money on one side and a Darwinian struggle for the middle class on the other side.In nearly every realm of daily life from health care to education, highways to home security there is an invisible velvet rope that divides how Americans live On one side of the rope, for a price, red tape is cut, lines are jumped, appointments are secured, and doors are opened On the other side, middle and working class Americans fight to find an empty seat on the plane, a place in line with their kids at the amusement park, a college acceptance, or a hospital bed We are all aware of the gap between the rich and everyone else, but when we weren t looking, business innovators stepped in to exploit it, shifting services away from the masses and finding new ways to profit by serving the privileged And as decision makers and corporate leaders increasingly live on the friction free side of the velvet rope, they are less inclined to change or even notice the obstacles everyone else must contend with Schwartz s must read book takes us on a behind the scenes tour of this new reality and shows the toll the velvet rope divide takes on society. New Read The Velvet Rope Economy [ author ] Nelson D. Schwartz [ Kindle ePUB or eBook ] – bluevapours.co.uk

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  • Hardcover
  • 352 pages
  • The Velvet Rope Economy
  • Nelson D. Schwartz
  • English
  • 05 May 2019
  • 0385543085

13 thoughts on “The Velvet Rope Economy

  1. Yun says:

    The Velvet Rope Economy shows how the ultra wealthy can pay their way past all the inconveniences in their lives and turn every experience into a luxury This includes not having to wait in line at amusement parks, getting box seats at sports games that allow for face time with athletes, retaining doctors on call, donating so much money to an Ivy League school that their children are admitted, and so muchOn the surface, this book seems like a worthwhile read, but it actually left me frust The Velvet Rope Economy shows how the ultra wealthy can pay their way past all the inconveniences in their lives and turn every experience into a luxury This includes not having to wait in line at amusement parks, getting box seats at sports games that allow for face time with athletes, retaining doctors on call, donating so much money to an Ivy League school that their children are admitted, and so muchOn the surface, this book seems like a worthwhile read, but it actually left me frustrated and annoyed, and I m going to try to articulate why.To begin with, this book conflates two completely different things into one Citizens of a first world country are entitled to certain things, such as access to quality health care and opportunities to have an affordable education that will lead to middle class earnings However, people are not entitled to skip lines, nor have access to famous athletes so they can get their ball signed, nor partake in luxurious air travel or cruises Yet this b...

  2. Paige says:

    The rise of the Velvet Rope Economy marks an end to the great democratization of American life in the post World War II eraWhat is the Velvet Rope The Velvet Rope uses class segregation to help businesses profit Think of the fast pass systems at theme parks that only certain family groups can afford Or the better seats at a sporting event Or even private education Why are businesses profiting from class segregation How did we get here There are several examples for everything this bThe rise of the Velvet Rope Economy marks an end to the great democratization of American life in the post World War II eraWhat is the Velvet Rope The Velvet Rope uses class segregation to help businesses profit Think of the fast pass systems at theme parks that only certain family groups can afford Or the better seats at a sporting event Or even private education Why are businesses profiting from class segregation How did we get here There are several examples for everything this book states You will be familiar with most of them if you have lived in the U.S for most of your life If you have not, this might be a big eye opener Different treatment, benefits, and price discrimination due to socioeconomic status is proven in airline services, theme parks, sporting events, health care, and education to name a few that are used as examp...

  3. Donna Hines says:

    The recent results from a Gallup Poll Jan 2018 showed that 36% Americans are dissatisfied with the ability to get ahead by working hard This should not be a surprise for anyone working today for peanuts while exhausting themselves daily for 10c raises as Top Producers Associate of the Months and whatever other title they wiggle in your face to try to achieve.I know this because like many of you I went from upper middle to extreme poverty now officially locked in to the bottom row.You mig The recent results from a Gallup Poll Jan 2018 showed that 36% Americans are dissatisfied with the ability to get ahead by working hard This should not be a surprise for anyone working today for peanuts while exhausting themselves daily for 10c raises as Top Producers Associate of the Months and whatever other title they wiggle in your face to try to achieve.I know this because like many of you I went from upper middle to extreme poverty now officially locked in to the bottom row.You might ask how Well, divorce, bankruptcy, no child support for over a year living on credit to raise a family of four, legal medical expenses, marital credit debt, student loan debt by way that MPA never used to raise 3 kids with son med disabled for life since birth I mention this once again not for sympathy, not empathy, not compassion...

  4. Sue Fernandez says:

    Thank you to NetGalley and Doubleday Books for advance copy of this book in exchange for my honest review I d thought I d start a non fiction book so I wasn t up too late This ended up keeping me up It reads smoothly, transitioning and segueing into different areas without effort I won t say this book didn t trouble mea lot Just this morning we were discussing how Disney has now fallen into this and they are offering VIP seating for the parades, plaid shirt treatment for a price, etc Thank you to NetGalley and Doubleday Books for advance copy of this book in exchange for my honest review I d thought I d start a non fiction book so I wasn t up too late This ended up keeping me up It reads smoothly, transitioning and segueing into different areas without effort I won t say this book didn t trouble mea lot Just this morni...

  5. Elizabeth Fensin says:

    First half is an entertaining anthropological look at how the 1% live The second half is depressing.

  6. Becky Diamond says:

    The Velvet Rope Economy is a shocking expos of our continually splintering economy and value system Schwartz skillfully navigates the playground of the super rich and their long list of premium experiences from VIP amusement park tours and luxury sports arena boxes to better access to hospitals and educational opportunities The real life examples and statistics he reveals invoke a wide range of emotions from bewilderment and envy to anger, disgust, disappointment and even fear As one very sm The Velvet Rope Economy is a shocking expos of our continually splintering economy and value system Schwartz skillfully navigates the playground of the super rich and their long list of premium experiences from VIP amusement park tours and luxury sports arena boxes to better access to hospitals and educational opportunities The real life examples and statistics he reveals invoke a wide range of emotions from bewilderment and envy to anger, disgust, disappoint...

  7. Ietrio says:

    Schwartz is having a mid life crisis Mommy used to buy him candies when he wanted to Than mommy got him to a good school Later mommy helped him get college education so he won t feel stupid when meeting his school friends M...

  8. Biblio Files (takingadayoff) says:

    Most of the information in the book you probably already know, such as that if you pay extra you can get personalized guided tours of Disneyland and that one of the reasons airlines make economy class so uncomfortable is to encourage you to pay to upgrade But there were a few things I didn t know such as that public schools now charge students to be on the school teams, and there may even be a charge to try out for a team So one of the ways that a kid used to be able to break out of poverty, e Most of the information in the book you probably already know, such as that if you pay extra you can get personalized guided tours of Disneyland and that one of the reasons airlines make economy class so uncomfortable is to encourage you to pay to upgrade But there were a few things I didn t know such as that public schools now charge students to be on the school teams, and there may even be a charge to try out for a team So one of the ways that a kid used to be able to break out of ...

  9. Csimplot Simplot says:

    Excellent book

  10. Kate Roark says:

    Interesting account of the velvet rope separating the haves and have nots in the economy While elites get special access to education, sporting events, travel, etc., others face a lack of access in health care, education, shopping and community The author ends the book o...

  11. Josh says:

    The Velvet Rope Economy How Inequality Became Big Business by Nelson D Schwartz is somewhat reminiscent of the syndicated TV show, Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous it provides an insider s look at the access and privilege that wealth affords in modern day America Schwartz loosely defines a velvet rope as figurative barrier with relative ease, efficiency and luxury on one side and hardship, struggle and latency on the other The principal tenet of The Velvet Rope Economy is that the modern v The Velvet Rope Economy How Inequality Became Big Business by Nelson D Schwartz is somewhat reminiscent of the syndicated TV show, Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous it provides an insider s look at the access and privilege that wealth affords in modern day America Schwartz loosely defines a velvet rope as figurative barrier with relative ease, efficiency and luxury on one side and hardship, struggle and latency on the other The principal tenet of The Velvet Rope Economy is that the modern velvet rope prevents the rich from even encountering the less well off thus eliminating their empathy towards them The Velvet Rope Economy is written in two parts The first part of the book describes life inside the velvet rope and the second part outside While most of the elements inside the velvet rope, first class travel accommodations, skipping the line at theme parks and express lanes on the highway, are perhaps unfair at best, Schwartz highlights a damming c...

  12. Clayton Porter says:

    You don t need to read this book It s just the aftermath of Nelson D Schwartz finding out life is unfair For someone who covered economic issues for the New York Times, it is surprising that Mr Schwartz only recently discovered this fact of life The author comes across as someone who grew up with money, but was envious of the kids at his school who had just a little bitmoney than him He never learned to enjoy the small things in life How just the fact that you are on vacation, or on You don t need to read this book It s just the aftermath of Nelson D Schwartz finding out life is unfair For someone who covered economic issues for the New York Times, it is surprising that Mr Schwartz only recently discovered this fact of life The author comes across as someone who grew up with money, but was envious of the kids at his school who had just a little bitmoney than him He never learned to enjoy the small things in life How just the fact that you are on vacation, or on an airplane, or at a ballpark is sweet enough Not everyone can afford even the basics of those things It is also surprising for someone who covered economics for the New York Times, that he would look down upon the practice of companies making a large about of money off luxuries for the rich If a company s business model provides me with a quality product Dreamliner jet that takes me, non stop, smoothly and safely across t...

  13. John Spiller says:

    More like 3.5 stars.

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